Suffolk University in Boston is now offering first year students “an extended transition program.” Taking place right after orientation, this program teaches students about “social justice” and “power and privilege.

‘Ram Academy’ is described as a “unique way to learn more, go further, and really connect with the Suffolk experience…while having the most fun possible with other new Rams.” Each ‘academy’ is “tailored to a different segment of the student experience…leadership, multiculturalism & social justice, Boston’s arts & culture community, and service & community engagement.”

Students have the option to attend the academy of their choice that deals specifically with each of these topics. The website gives the following summary of the Social Justice Ram Academy:

“This session provides students with an opportunity to explore the concept of social justice through self-reflection, team building activities, organizing, self-expression, and critical thinking through a variety of discussions, workshops, and projects. This Academy seeks to provide students with a forum to engage in dialogues on equality, access, and equity and become catalysts for social, political, and environmental change in their communities.”

The social justice academy is $40 dollars, and lasts three days. Students who attend the academy are expected to walk away with several learning outcomes, such as exploration of “individual and group identity issues and situate these issues within broader systemic and institutional contexts,” and learning “about support services and opportunities to engage with social justice at Suffolk.”

Diversity Services at Suffolk offer several other workshops in addition to Ram Academy. Some of the listed trainings include ‘Safe Zone’, ‘Introduction to Diversity and Social Justice’, and ‘Race, Racism, and Privilege’. The website also allows students to request new trainings or step up to host a training.

Another specific training that is listed is ‘Social Justice Interventions: Being an Active Bystander’. This training is designed to inform students “about how to be an effectively disrupt and reduce prejudice and discrimination against historically marginalized communities on and off campus.” Some of the topics covered are ‘safe space creation’ and ‘social identity exploration’.

What do you think? Let Turning Point News know in the comments!

(H/T: Campus Reform)

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